"You get out of Junto what you want to get out of Junto. You have to create your own experience and be open to what’s going to happen. The work is inside of yourself, and Junto helps to bring it out."

 

What is your strength when it comes to emotional intelligence?

Empathy or I would say, maybe the ability to harmonize, which goes along with empathy.

What is your superpower?

Risk-taking and synthesis. I really don’t have that little voice on my shoulder that says, “this could go wrong”. And I’m better than most at putting together disparate pieces or putting things together that wouldn’t normally belong.

What are 1-2 leadership virtues you've observed or learned in your career?  

One virtue I’ve learned is true empowerment; allow people to take over and do their job. If you give somebody the authority to take a project and run with it, and then you step in when you see that the first try failed, if you jump in and try to fix it, that’s not empowerment. If you tell someone they have authority but they have to check with you first, that’s not empowerment.

How would you describe your areas of expertise based on industry, market, and/or function?

My industry expertise is technology. My functional expertise is in leadership, product development, engineering, R&D, business growth and development, and CEO and CTO roles.

What was your most memorable Junto moment?

At the first Junto Night (my graduation), another Junto member and I were asked by Raman to chat with a prospective new member, and do kind of an informal interview, and afterwards we both told Raman that we didn’t think the company would be a good fit. Even though it would have nicely rounded out the next cohort and he wanted it to work, Raman said, “I trust you two, the company isn’t getting in”. It really made me trust the Junto community.

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What is one book, blog, or podcast you recommend widely?

A book I’d recommend is Great by Choice by Jim Collins. I’d also recommend the MIT Technology Review magazine.

What have you learned about yourself through participating in Junto?

First, I wasn’t letting people be good employees. I tell team members that they have great potential and abilities but I’m scared to let them actually flex those muscles, so I’ve had to let go of that. I can’t say one thing and then turn around and say another.

Second, I learned that you get out of Junto what you want to get out of Junto. You have to create your own experience and be open to what’s going to happen. The work is inside of yourself, and Junto helps to bring it out.

Finish the following sentence, "In my experience, ______________."

People crave critical feedback as much as they crave open and supportive environments.

What are you working on right now?

Throwing away my default assumptions about how my company is going to grow and how things are going to progress. I think we tend to hold ourselves back far more than our environment does, and when someone goes in with assumptions or expectations about how things will go, they’ve prevented themselves from being open to a new possibility.