"The most memorable [moments are when] people get something like emotional intelligence, or they figure out their vision, mission, and values, or they come out with a different perspective on what leading and managing is all about." 

 

What is your strength when it comes to emotional intelligence?

I think it’s all in the category of relationship management - I’m well-rounded and can form well-rounded relationships. In business, I like the teamwork aspect, and I’m a huge believer that you’ve got to build and align people toward a common purpose by generating motivation from within.

What is something that's not on your LinkedIn profile that you wish was?

What happened to my life once I packed up and moved: I lived in Asia from 1977 into 1988, and then continued to work there from 1988 until 1995.

What are you working on right now?

Day Stansbury.jpg

What I’m working on right now is very Junto-related. I’ve been in conversations with Raman about what will be the evolution of the mentor program. It’s really got me intrigued as far as how that group extends, or can extend, beyond the program itself.

What are 1-2 leadership virtues you've observed or learned in your career?

One is global thinking - the ability to look at something broader than just “I’m here to make money”, and understanding a larger purpose. The second one is walking the talk. The type of values that an individual or company keeps have always stood out to me, and whether they demonstrate them by what they do.

What have you learned about yourself mentoring with Junto?

That I do have something to offer. The thing that I found about focusing on financial services early on in my career was that I had such a one track mind, didn’t have exposure to other industries, and wondered if I really had anything to offer. I’m always surprised by the Apprentices saying how much they get out of the sessions. Mentoring with Junto has also reinforced how much I enjoy supporting others.

What is one book, blog, or podcast you recommend widely?

There are three books that come to mind, but I tend to go back to ancient wisdom or philosophy. The first one is Shambhala: The Sacred Path of the Warrior by Chögyam Trungpa. It’s about the old Buddhist branch of religion and translating it into different areas of thought. The second is Ancient Art of War by Sun Tzu. I like it in terms of the way the Tzu frames approaching situations like war, with an enemy. The third is an adaptation of the Tao of Leadership by John Heider.

What is your most memorable Junto moment?

Hearing about the alumni’s “life after Junto” - they’ve gained a new perspective. The most memorable are the people that get something like emotional intelligence, or they figure out their vision, mission, and values, or they come out with a different perspective on what leading and managing is all about. In so many conversations, I saw that the “a-ha” moment really happened for them. The thing that captures my attention is that people change because of this experience.

Finish the following sentence: "In my experience, ______________."

Windows and doors don’t really close in the way that people think and in the way that people try and create urgency around them.

How would you describe your areas of expertise based on industry, market, and/or function?

Spaces that are universal to me that transcend industry are consulting, leadership development, and client management. I spent 20-plus years was in technology outsourcing, and a lot of what I did was client management and leadership development within the organization.

What is your superpower?

Very simply, the ability to befriend children and animals.